Uncivil Society Part 1b: Universal Basic Income

This is a followup to Part 1 in my series exploring flaws in the reasoning behind current widely-held social ideals. Put your thinking cap on and take this opportunity to consider what’s written here. If you prefer to abdicate your responsibility for critical thought, and you’ve come just to loudly expound on the dearly-held ideas that were given to you by others, please take advantage of either the “back” or “close tab” button on your browser. Otherwise, disagreement and reasoned debate are welcome. Enjoy.

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Uncivil Society Part 1: The Robin Hood Stigma

This is part 1 in my series exploring flaws in the reasoning behind current widely-held social ideals. Part 1b, the followup to this post, is here. Put your thinking cap on and take this opportunity to consider what’s written here. If you prefer to abdicate your responsibility for critical thought, and you’ve come just to loudly expound on the dearly-held ideas that were given to you by others, please take advantage of either the “back” or “close tab” button on your browser. Otherwise, disagreement and reasoned debate are welcome. Enjoy.

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Shame

This morning I was playing Trivia Crack because my wife likes me to play with her even though my win rate against her is almost two out of three, and there was a question about nuclear weapons. Specifically, it asked where the first use of nuclear weapons against civilians was, and because I didn’t take the time to read it thoroughly, I got it wrong and put the United States (the country who used the nukes). But after that I thought about that event and felt an overwhelming sense of sadness and nationalistic shame.

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Unalienable Rights

To continue the thread started with my earlier post on the ideal of equality, it seems extremely strange to me when people oppose that ideal. It just doesn’t make any sense given my worldview, though I suppose I can understand how it happens. It’s the same as the way that often people like the idea of competition, imagining how great it would be to be the best, when statistically they will almost certainly fall short.

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Fat

I’ve been having a hard time cutting my fat percentage back again. I started to eat more to keep up with my Camp Gladiator workouts, since my performance had been disappointing for months while I had no fat left to burn. I was at around 7% body fat, and once I started eating more that went up to about 10%. I’ve been trying to cut back again, and making a higher percentage of it protein (I’m still a vegetarian), to get to a maintainable 8%, but have been having trouble getting under the 9% mark. It seems like my body wants to hang out around 9.5%, but I’m not really happy with how that looks on me.

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On the ideal of equality

What does the idea that we are all equal really mean?

Well, to begin with, we have to define “we.” Because if it’s one of the more obvious definitions, including everything about us, then we’re obviously not equal. We’re all different, and constantly changing. Of course we are. How could anyone believe we’re all equal? Well, without specifically discarding things from our definition of what we are in order to find something that can be considered “equal,” what are we, really? What is the core of each of us? What are we that doesn’t change?

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Am I the only one who found this sponsored tweet asinine?

Here it is with my response:

Democracy à la mode

Suppose you want to be president of the United States. How would you get there? Well, assuming you were born into a wealthy family, you might start with law school and local politics. Make sure to practice public speaking and cultivate as much personal charisma as you can muster. Campaigns are expensive, and you wouldn’t want to squander all of your family’s wealth on them, so seek sponsors. After all, you understand that a personal investment of wealth in your own campaigns is a gamble, but for sponsors it’s an investment. Use the money donated by wealthy corporate and individual sponsors to advertise. To attain these donations, of course, you must support the interests of donors when in office. Those are the interests important to you for keeping your office; the lower classes can be influenced well enough by advertising and speeches, and you don’t even have to bother trying to earn the votes of partisans at all, as long as you purport to be a member of their party.

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